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20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
. also tonight, passing the baton. the u.s. is planning to turn over leadership of the libya mission to nato. tokyo's water is declared safe again, but not before a radiation scare causes a run on bottled water. and an air traffic controller in washington is suspended after falling asleep. leaving commercial jetliners to land on their own. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. every so often the census bureau gives americans a look in the mirror to see who we are and how we're changing and a report from the bureau today says one thing that's changing is the racial and ethnic makeup of the country with the hispanic population growing rapidly. one out of six adults is now hispanic as is one out of four children. in the past ten years, the overall u.s. population has grown by 27 million to 308 million and hispanics account for more than half the increase. more now from nancy cordes. >> reporter: salt lake city's newest grocery store caters to a group that census figur
't predict how long the operation will last, he did say the u.s. could transfer control of it to allied by saturday. meanwhile, house speaker boehner wrote to president obama today to complain that the mission's goals are not clearly defined. more now from mark phillips in tripoli. >> reporter: day five of the bombing campaign over libya and the combined coalition air forces have declared something like victory. >> their air force no longer exists as a fighting force. to the point that we can operat. >> reporter: control of the skies has led to near control on the ground, as moammar qaddafi's forces have learned. and as the bombing has continued, the brave face of the regime is showing some worry lines. instead of rambling on for hours as he often does, moammar qaddafi's latest pep rally's speech lasted a brief three minutes. out in public is a risky place for him to be these days. and where the obedient cheering crowds once numbered in tens of thousands, now they are often down to a few hundred, sometimes to mere dozens. even the regime's once p.r. machine is grinding down. today after
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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